22 Jan


From New York to South Africa: Lending a loving hand overseas


Mary Bocskocsky tutors a child in Cape Town, South Africa.

Fusing hands-on education with a passion for philanthropy, Mount Saint Mary College student Mary Bocskocsky recently taught basic math and English skills to underprivileged children in South Africa.

Bocskocsky wanted to put her teaching techniques to the test before graduating, and decided to make a humanitarian journey to Gordon’s Bay in Cape Town, South Africa.

At the Ikhaya le Themba (Home of Hope) shelter, Bocskocsky spent weeks teaching basic literacy and mathematic skills to a classroom of three- to five-year-olds. She increased her students’ skills by reading to them, introducing them to math problems, and having them write the alphabet on a small blackboard.

Literacy skills were a major focus for Mary Bocskocsky during her recent humanitarian trip.

“While I was teaching in South Africa, I saw how much I had gained from the Mount’s education program,” she explained. “Without my Mount classes, I wouldn’t have been able to do this.”

Upon her return from Africa, Bocskocsky student taught at Glenham Elementary School in Beacon, N.Y. under the tutelage of cooperating teacher Danielle Yeaple, a Mount graduate.

“I told my students that there are kids in South Africa, just like them, learning how to read,” she explained.

Mary Bocskocsky reads to children in South Africa.

Learn more about the Mount’s education program on the web at www.msmc.edu.

Questions? Email admissions@msmc.edu or call 1-888-YES-MSMC (1-888-937-6762).

06 Oct


Celebrating Mass with Pope Francis


On Friday, September 25, 2015, nearly 40 Mount Saint Mary College students joined 20,000 faithful at Pope Francis’s Madison Square Garden Mass in New York City. Pope Francis discussed the challenges of life in a large city and expressed concern for the Big Apple’s underprivileged citizens. For Clare O’Keefe, a public relations and journalism major, the Mass was a life-changing experience. “It was unbelievable,” said Clare. “As soon as the Pope came into Madison Square Garden, I immediately felt a very spiritual presence. I’ve never felt like that before.” Watch the video above to hear more from Clare and Fr. Francis Amodio, O.Carm, the College’s chaplain and director of Campus Ministry.

Video produced by Danangelowe Spencer ’17

04 May


Advice for the Class of 2019


In exactly twelve days, Jade Hanley and Emily DiBiase will become graduating members of the Class of 2015. As the students who have brought you Knight Life for the past few semesters, Jade and Emily wanted to share some of their advice with the Class of 2019 before they become official alumnae of the College.

On Opening Day

Jade: Don’t stress out on moving in with “strangers” because these people quickly become your Mount family. I’m still friends with my first roommates! Opening Day is a good time to get to know each other. This is also a crucial time to set up schedules. You should always know your roommate’s schedule (like when they wake up in the morning). Also, don’t be afraid to set up a cleaning schedule right away! It’s better now in a definitive format than later when dust bunnies are taking over.

Emily: Opening Day will be one of the most stressful and yet absolutely wonderful days of your life. The people who you meet today will be your classmates, co-workers, and best friends for the next four years and beyond. Make this a day to reinvent yourself and be whoever you want to be in a brand-new place! Also, go to the Club Fair on Opening night; getting involved on campus will make the Mount seem like your home in no time. Continue Reading

20 Apr


Fulfilling My Dreams at the New Critics Conference


Emily DiBiase (far right) presented her paper “Enlightened or Undeceived: Paths to Uncovering the Truth in Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey” at SUNY Oneonta’s New Critics Conference on April 11, 2015.

Ever since I was a freshman, I have wanted to participate in the New Critics Conference. Held at SUNY Oneonta every April, the conference features undergraduate student presenters who read critical papers that they have written about either literature or composition. As a shiny-eyed freshman, presenting at this conference seemed to be the most unattainable, but elite, honor. I wondered if I would ever be confidant enough to present at such a conference.

Last Saturday, I fulfilled my freshman dream by presenting at the New Critics Conference.

This year’s encounter with the conference began as all of my others have ﹘ one of my professors gave out the flyer in class and I thought, “I would love to do that someday.” I even taped the flyer to my desk, hoping that would inspire me. Still, I just didn’t have the nerve to apply. Continue Reading