Tagged: eaglewatch2018

18 May

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Eagle Watch – May 18, 2018

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After the storm that touched down in Newburgh on Tuesday, many of you were asking us if the eagles and eaglets made it through. As of this morning, we were finally able to see that all four made it through! This photo was taken this afternoon, May 18. Photo by Lee Ferris.

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03 May

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Eagle Watch – May 2, 2018

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Hi all,
The breeding season for birds is in full swing and no better example of that is with our very own Bald Eagle pair.  Yesterday, 1 May, I was able to snap a few pictures of the eaglets (nestling eagles) as they were being fed pieces of fish by the breeding female. One looks to be slightly larger than the other (notice the black on one of the eaglet’s bill), which is a common feature of hatching dynamics in birds. If food continues to come in at a good pace, we’ll have two nestlings ready to leave the nest in about 10 weeks! I’ll post better pictures of the activity at the nest sooner than later, but for now, here are ‘our’ eaglets!

Cheers,

Doug Robinson

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14 Mar

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Eagle Watch – March 14, 2018

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Good morning on Pi day everyone,

We have some good news this morning: we have a female Bald Eagle now incubating *something* in the nest! I thought I could see the female on the nest on Sunday night around 10:30pm, but couldn’t quit be certain of my observation. Having looked yesterday and not discerned the female sitting low in the nest yesterday, I was dubious of my observation on Sunday. But today? Yep! She is on the nest and from her behaviors in the nest this morning (https://photos.app.goo.gl/FRNuw1WaicgbxZa02 ), she is clearly sitting atop something in the nest; look at the video at 45s and see she stands and waddles in the nest, movements that indicate she’s adjusting egg/s in the nest. Without climbing to the nest, we can’t be certain how many eggs she might be on, but in about 35ish days, we’ll know.

Below is a picture of the male (on the right) visiting the female while she sits low in the nest (sorry about the quality; it’s windy out there!).

How fortunate are we?!

Cheers,

Doug Robinson

 

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